Cat shedding. Funny Twitter & Instagram.

Favorite cat-shedding Tweet for today . . .

“need some sort of IoT device to measure cat shedding rate: estimate my personal data point sheds at a rate of ~0.7 new cats/day”

Favorite cat-shedding Instagram for today . . .

A sure sign of spring… cat shedding so much it’s sticking to the walls…

Email me (catgroomnyc@yahoo.com) to schedule a house call bath & blow dry.  Look to the right to see my experience, education and training.

 

Too much fur? Brushing helps.

Even if it feels as though there is still a ton of fur after brushing, brushing does help.

How can that be?

There’s a build-up of shed fur which you’re picking away at. You’re like a miner excavating a tunnel.  Can’t clear away all those rocks in one day!

Don’t give up hope! Eventually you’ll brush away the built-up fur that has been sticking to your cat with the help of friction and body oil.

Then all you need to do is keep up the maintenance.

You can do it yourself or you can call a cat groomer.  Either way works.

You know what doesn’t work? Sitting around wishing that Fluffy wasn’t so  fluffy.

It takes action to get a reaction.

 

Cat Sitting for Persians and Other Long-Haired Cats

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I receive calls after every holiday.

“My brother was supposed to look after my cat, but he didn’t comb her. Now she’s completely matted! Can you groom her today?”

You diligently combed your cat, but a week or two without combing undid all your work.

Suggestions:

Select a cat sitter, such as myself, who can also do some combing, as long as your cat allows strangers to comb her.

Schedule a grooming session for a day or two after your return, so that you won’t have to worry about whether the cat groomer will be available.

Schedule a thorough combing, and perhaps a bath, before you leave on vacation. De-shedding should help to cut down on matting, since mats are made of natural skin oil and shed fur.

Happy Holidays!

Hairball season

Fur from brushing a cat
This is why I brush my short-haired cat every day. Hairballs decrease.

Cats usually shed more when the days become longer or shorter.  If they lick shed fur, they can wind up vomiting hairballs. Vomiting is uncomfortable for kitty. Remember the last time you vomited? It felt bad, didn’t it? If the hairball is deep in the intestine, it can even become lodged there.

Brush your cat gently but throughly as often as you can.

If your cat has already vomited up a furball, try giving kitty Petromalt (available in fish, chicken or malt flavor) to ease the furballs out without the need for vomiting.

No more hairballs

Throwing up hairballs isn’t natural. If cats still lived outdoors, shedded fur would be blown off or pulled off. In the home, fur detaches, gets licked into the throat and is either vomited out, or accumulates enough to create an obstruction if it doesn’t pass through the body.  Everyone has time for 15 seconds of brushing a day. For a short-haired cat, 15 seconds can mean the difference between hairballs and no hairballs. The volume of shedding fur usually increases dramatically in spring and fall.

Love glove mitt briskly stroking fur.
Love Glove mitt briskly stroking fur. Cats enjoy this.
After 3 seconds.
After 3 seconds brushing my cat Emma.
After a few more seconds . . .
After a few more seconds . . .
Done for the day. 15 seconds of brushing.
Done for the day. 15 seconds of brushing.

To buy the grooming mitt – Four Paws Purple Love Glove Cat Grooming Mitt

My cat is shedding too much. Solutions for shedding.

Some short-haired cats release a large amount of hair in the spring.

I removed this fur using the soft Love Glove.  The cat purred during the grooming. This same cat is brushed four times a week, but look how much fur comes off!  Now she won’t have to cough up hair balls or walk around with a coat that is twice as heavy as it needs to be in the warm weather.

To buy: Four Paws Purple Love Glove Cat Grooming Mitt

After two minutes of brushing with the Love Glove!
After 2 minutes of brushing with the Love Glove!

Loveglove1

Lion Cut + Old, skinny cat = Blood + Stitches

Bad human!
Yep. You don’t want to be the one who did this.

There’s a heap of denial among cat-loving humans who have skinny, old cats.

Is a cute-looking haircut and less fur on the sofa worth blood and stitches? If you say HECK YEAH! then go to it. Fire up that clipper.

I’m of the opinion that the answer is HECK NO.  I won’t do a lion cut if the cat is likely to be nicked during the shaving process.

I do make an exception for old cats who are so matted that they are uncomfortable. Their comfort is important, so it’s worth the risk.

Long-haired old cats stay dirtier and can’t deal with their own fur. Their tongue is worn out, I guess, not to mention the arthritis. They’re like that uncle who drinks too much and can’t remember to comb his hair . . . . you know, the uncle with the shirts covered with stains? You won’t do his laundry because who knows what he’s gotten into?

Cat skin is as thick as your eyelid. Think about that. You want me to come over and shave your eyelid?

The technical, boring discussion is below. You can skip it, unless you’re deeply interested in shaving cat’s privates.

1. Cat clippers work best on a flat plane. They zip along a flat surface and get every last hair off quickly and safely.

2. Cat clippers on an angle aim the blade at tender skin.  The blade isn’t parallel to the skin.  It’s going INTO the skin.  DANGER ZONES: clipping the fur in the underarms or between the rear legs. “I can’t believe what I’m seeing” thin skin combined with peaks and valleys. DANGER.

3. The thinner the cat, the more peaks and valleys, and the harder it is to shave safely. Shaving a fat cat is like shaving a balloon. It’s much easier to  shave a fat cat than a skinny cat.

4. The older the cat, the thinner and looser the skin.

Comb your cat every day, gently work on the mats with a comb, or maybe a round-tip scissor. If you’re a butterfingers be patient.  Spend some money on my services if you can’t do it yourself.

Awwww. Kisses.
Awwww. Kisses.