What is this cat thinking?

Can you tell what your cat is thinking? As a cat groomer, I need to be able to “read” a cat.

This cat is one of my feline friends. I visit her several times a week to cat sit, trim claws, brush her and every so often, bathe her.  I have been her “nanny” for over two years.

I hold her in my lap like this about once a week, so she is used to it.  She doesn’t wiggle or try to get away. She certainly doesn’t hiss, scratch or try to bite.

This is a photo of a cat who is with a trusted caretaker, engaging in a routine activity.  This is not a photo of a cat who is scared, apprehensive, angry, timid or tense.

Photo on 3-3-13 at 10.54 AM #3
Notice that claws are not extended, pupils are not dilated, and the cat looks confidently at the camera instead of looking down.

Why cat eyes look like cat eyes

Why cats have slit-shaped pupils
The eyes of an ambush predator who happens to live in your home and sleep in your bed.

Cats are ambush predators. If you’ve ever been ambushed by your own cat, this will come as no surprise.  This also explains why cats love to hide behind doors prior to pouncing on unsuspecting toys.

“Species with pupils that are vertical slits are more likely to be ambush predators that are active both day and night. In contrast, those with horizontally elongated pupils are extremely likely to be plant-eating prey species with eyes on the sides of their heads.”

” Circular pupils were linked to “active foragers,” or animals that chase down their prey.”

Humans have circular pupils.

But wait, there’s more.

“A surprising thing we noticed from this study is that the slit pupils were linked to predators that were close to the ground,” said William Sprague, a postdoctoral researcher in Banks’ lab. “So domestic cats have vertical slits, but bigger cats, like tigers and lions, don’t. Their pupils are round, like humans and dogs.”

From Science Advances, by way of ScienceDaily